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Servicing the towns of:
Enfield  |  Ellington  |  East Windsor  |  Windsor Locks Suffield  |  Vernon  |  Windham  |  Stafford

Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention

The state of Connecticut has set a goal of eliminating childhood lead poisoning within the state by the year 2010.  In support of this goal, the North Central District Health Department is mandated by The Connecticut State Statutes to investigate and follow up on elevated blood lead levels in children under the age of six. As part of this mandate, the district conducts follow-up epidemiological as well as environmental investigations.


What is Lead?

Lead is a soft, malleable metal that is dull grayish color when exposed to air, and shiny chrome-silver like when melted into a liquid. It is a potent neurotoxin that accumulates in soft tissue as well as bone. Lead has the potential to damage the nervous system and cause brain disorders in humans. It is poisonous to adults and children alike.

Where is Lead Found?

In general, the older your home, the more likely it has lead-based paint.

  • Paint. Many homes built before 1978 have lead-based paint. The federal government banned lead-based paint from housing in 1978. Some states stopped its use even earlier. Lead can be found:

    1. In homes in the city, country, or suburbs.
    2. In apartments, single-family homes, and both private and public housing.
    3. Inside and outside of the house.
  • In soil around a home. Soil can pick up lead from exterior paint, or other sources such as past use of leaded gas in cars, and children playing in yards can ingest or inhale lead dust.
  • Household dust. Dust can pick up lead from deteriorating lead-based paint or from soil tracked into a home.
  • Drinking water. Your home might have plumbing with lead or lead solder. Call your local health department or water supplier to find out about testing your water. You cannot see, smell or taste lead, and boiling your water will not get rid of lead. If you think your plumbing might have lead in it:
  • Use only cold water for drinking and cooking.
  • Run water for 15 to 30 seconds before drinking it, especially if you have not used your water for a few hours.
  • The job. If you work with lead, you could bring it home on your hands or clothes. Shower and change clothes before coming home. Launder your work clothes separately from the rest of your family's clothes.
  • Old painted toys and furniture.
  • Food and liquids stored in lead crystal or lead-glazed pottery or porcelain. Food can become contaminated because lead can leach in from these containers.
  • Lead smelters or other industries that release lead into the air.
  • Hobbies that use lead, such as making pottery or stained glass, or refinishing furniture.
  • Folk remedies that contain lead, such as "greta" and "azarcon" used to treat an upset stomach.

Protect Yourself and Your Family...

If you suspect that your house has lead hazards, you can take some immediate steps to reduce your family's risk:

  • If you rent, notify your landlord of peeling or chipping paint.
  • Clean up paint chips immediately.
  • Clean floors, window frames, window sills, and other surfaces weekly. Use a mop, sponge, or paper towel with warm water and a general all-purpose cleaner or a cleaner made specifically for lead. REMEMBER: NEVER MIX AMMONIA AND BLEACH PRODUCTS TOGETHER SINCE THEY CAN FORM A DANGEROUS GAS.
  • Thoroughly rinse sponges and mop heads after cleaning dirty or dusty areas.
  • Wash children's hands often, especially before they eat and before nap time and bed time.
  • Keep play areas clean. Wash bottles, pacifiers, toys, and stuffed animals regularly.
  • Keep children from chewing window sills or other painted surfaces.
  • Clean or remove shoes before entering your home to avoid tracking in lead from soil.
  • Make sure children eat healthy and nutritious meals. Children with good diets absorb less lead.

Additional steps:

  • You can temporarily reduce lead hazards by taking actions such as repairing damaged painted surfaces and planting grass to cover soil with high lead levels. These actions are not permanent solutions and will need ongoing attention.
  • To permanently remove lead hazards, you must hire a certified lead "abatement" contractor. Abatement (or permanent hazard elimination) methods include removing, sealing, or enclosing lead-based paint with special materials. Just painting over the hazard with regular paint is not enough.
  • Always hire a person with special training for correcting lead problems -- someone who knows how to do this work safely and has the proper equipment to clean up thoroughly. Certified contractors will employ qualified workers and follow strict safety rules set by our state and the federal government.
  • Contact our office for help with locating a certified contractor.

If you or someone you know is in need of information on Childhood Lead Poisoning, you may contact our office at (860) 745-0383 or follow the link below:

CT DPH Lead Poisoning & Prevention Control Program

About NCDHD

The North Central District Health Department is a full-time Public Health Department with a full-time staff funded by its member towns and a annual per capita grant from the Connecticut State Department of Public Health

Our Mission is to prevent disease, injury, and disability by promoting and protecting the health and well-being of the public and our environment.

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